What Are Three Key Principles Of The Treaty Of Waitangi?

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important today?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected..

What is Waitangi Day and why do we celebrate it?

Every year on 6 February, New Zealand marks the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. In that year, representatives of the British Crown and over 500 Māori chiefs signed what is often considered to be New Zealand’s founding document.

How was the Treaty of Waitangi broken?

The land was lost through a combination of private and Government purchases, outright confiscation, and Native Land Court practices that made it difficult for Māori to maintain their land under traditional ownership structures. There were some purchases of Māori land made before the Treaty was signed.

What were the terms of the Treaty of Waitangi?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

When the Treaty of Waitangi was signed in 1840 there was a worldwide movement to abolish slavery. … Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land.

What was NZ like before the treaty?

The history of Māori migration and settlement in Aotearoa and the stories of Te Ao Māori (The Māori World) have been retained in the oral histories of each iwi (tribe) and hapu (sub-tribe). Histories of the Māori people are told in the creation stories.

Why is the concept of the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi problematic?

Why is the concept of ‘the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi’ problematic? It is problematic because it is not clear who defines the principles. … Someone was sued by a timber country so Te Heuheu Tukino took the case to the Privy Council arguing that the legislation went against the treaty and therefore was invalid.

What happened after the Treaty of Waitangi?

What happened after the Treaty was signed? Shortly after the Treaty was signed, Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. … Under British law, New Zealand became technically a part of the colony of New South Wales.

Who signed the Treaty of Waitangi first?

Hone Heke6 February 1840 Hone Heke was the first to sign. That day at Waitangi, about 40 rangatira signed the Treaty. The Treaty was then taken around the country by British officials and missionaries to collect more signatures. Most rangatira who signed drew their moko as their signature.

When were the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi developed?

1989Treaty principles developed by the Crown In 1989 the fourth Labour government became the first New Zealand government to set out principles to guide its actions on matters relating to the treaty. These principles were: the government has the right to govern and make laws.

What does the treaty principle of protection involve?

The principle of protection is about actively protecting Māori knowledge, interests, values, and other taonga. … Consequently, all students need opportunities to learn te reo Māori and gain knowledge and experience of important Māori concepts and customs, considering them in relation to those of other cultures.

What are treaty obligations?

treaty obligations in British English (ˈtriːtɪ ˌɒblɪˈɡeɪʃənz) plural noun. obligations or duties that must be carried out by a party as according to a treaty they have entered into.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The principles of partnership, participation and protection underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi.

What are the main points of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori. At the same time, the Treaty gave the Crown the right to govern New Zealand and to represent the interests of all New Zealanders.

What the Treaty of Waitangi means to me?

From a caregiver: To me the Treaty means that I take care of my client in a way that supports and acknowledges and protects their culture. That I work with my client and their community in partnership when writing a health plan or making a decision about my client’s health.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi do?

The purpose of the Treaty was to enable the British settlers and the Māori people to live together in New Zealand under a common set of laws or agreements. The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

Why did the Treaty of Waitangi happen?

Reasons why chiefs signed the treaty included wanting controls on sales of Māori land to Europeans, and on European settlers. They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in nursing?

The Treaty of Waitangi gives an assurance for both nurse and patient that they will work together to preserve and improve better health outcomes. … It also ensures the servicers and delivery of health is done in an appropriate way. Nurses and midwifes must respect and protect Maori beliefs (Nursing Council, 2009).