What Does ß Mean?

Is ß the same as SS?

In German, the ß character is called eszett.

It’s used in “Straße,” the word for street, and in the expletive “Scheiße.” It’s often transliterated as “ss,” and strangely enough, it’s never had an official uppercase counterpart.

The letter “a” has “A” and “b” has “B,” while ß had… nothing..

What is this symbol ß?

The letter ß (also known as sharp S, German: Eszett or scharfes S) is a letter in the German alphabet. It is the only German letter that is not part of the basic Latin alphabet. The letter is pronounced [s] (like the “s” in “see”). The ß character is not used in any other languages.

Is ß still used?

While the ß was abandoned in Swiss orthography and a German reform in 1996 simplified (and reduced) its use, it is definitely still widely used and required. Specifically, the ß is used for a Voiceless alveolar fricative sound after a long vowel or diphtong. After a short vowel, ss is used.

Why do S’s look like F’s?

The long s can be traced back to Roman times, when the lowercase s typical took an elongated form in cursive writing in Latin. According to librarians at the New York Academy of Medicine, people were using the long s at the beginning and middle of words by the 12th century.

What does Ü mean in German?

A glyph, U with umlaut, appears in the German alphabet. It represents the umlauted form of u, which results in the same sound as the [y]. It can also represent [ʏ]. The letter is collated together with U, or as UE. … In Swedish the letter is called tyskt y which means German y.